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How to Repair a Pedestal Table

Milton Bates. Furniture Kare (Care) Company
The repair of a pedestal table with 3 or 4 curved legs presents a difficult problem for the repair technician. The curved part of the table legs makes it difficult to attach clamps to apply the proper pressure directly to the glue joint where the leg attaches to the center support. See photograph 1.

Photograph 1: Pedestal table with curved legs
These instructions and photographs describe a method that allows the repair in a rapid and efficient method. This method works both on three (3) or four (4) legged tables. Inspect the pedestal and determine which joints are broken and need repair. You might have to use a mallet or pry bar to open the joint so that you can effectively apply the glue to the inside surfaces of the joint. Inspect each curved leg to determine if it needs to be re-glued. Commonly, you will find that the legs are made up of several pieces of wood glued together which may have split apart. The legs need to be repaired before reattaching them to center post. See Photographs 2 and 3.

Photograph 2: Legs made up of several pieces of wood

Photograph 3: Leg separating from pedestal
The challenge to this repair is how to apply pressure on the glue joint connecting the table leg to the center pedestal. Apply a 4” C-Clamp (the clamp needs to be tightened down hard) with glue blocks on each side of the table leg to protect the sides of the legs. (See photographs 4. and 5.) A third glue block, cut to the width of the table leg, is applied between the table leg and the C-Clamp. This glue block is to protect the table leg edge once a bar clamp is applied. The 4” C-Clamp side bar should be aligned to the center of the glue joint of the center pedestal and table leg.

Photograph 4: Third glue block between table leg and C-Clamp.
Glue blocks at pressure points protect both sides of table leg.

Photograph 5: Opposite side of table leg illustrating glue block
between clamp and pressure point on table leg.
Once the C-Clamps and glue have been applied to the joint, a 24” Bar clamp with a 4” throat can be used to apply direct pressure across to the joint. (See photographs 6, 7, and 8.) The Bar clamp can be tightened; this should close the joint.

Photograph 6: Bar clamp with 4” throat catches the glue block held by C-Clamp.
See Photograph 7 illustrating how the other end of the clamp catches the other side.

Photograph 7: The other side of the Bar clamp, catching
the glue block held by C-Clamp on opposite leg.

Photograph 8: Another view of the Bar-clamp on the opposite side.
Allow the glue to dry for 24 hours and then remove the clamps and the repair should be completed. Carefully remove any excess glue that has leaked from the joint. The repair should now be complete and you can continue with further work on the table.
Tools Needed:
Glue blocks, x6
4” C-Clamps
24” Bar Clamp with 4” Throat
Polyurethane Glue
Glue Brush


Furniture Kare Company
Milton Bates
8274 Fair Church Rd
Browns Summit, NC, 27214  USA

Telephone (336 )695-4836 Cell (731) 695-1014
Email Furniture-kare36@triad.rr.com

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